Starting with EB Games in Australia, we built a global intelligent reward & recognition program with the gamer at its core.

The project.

An integrated, centralised customer management system that just happened to create globe-wide loyalty amongst GameStop gamers.

The single customer view that connects retail, online and call centre.

The outcome.

A centralised omni-view of all members and an integrated system that recognises and rewards in real-time across multiple channels.

The single customer view that connects retail, online and call centre.

Battle plan.

EB Games Australia came to us with some objectives for managing their customers. They wanted to understand customers better, understand their stores better, maximise reward, minimise friction and avoid points & discount rewards that harmed their bottom line.

Retail staff could greet customers and know their last five transactions.
From Australia, the program grew to cover 12 markets.

First Australia, then the world.

After huge Australian success, CX Lavender won the tender to run loyalty globally for EB Games' parent company GameStop, which now operates across 12 markets around the world.

From Australia, the program grew to cover 12 markets.

Secret weapon, Loyalty4.

The program runs entirely on the capability of Loyalty4, our 
house-developed loyalty software. Each module of Loyalty4 enabled data-driven features, insights and communication.

House-developed software Loyalty4 powered the system.

$6 million in revenue in 5 minutes thanks to the system’s lightning reactivity.

True centralisation.

The program is engineered so that every transaction, across every customer touchpoint, comes through one integrated system. For the gamer, this means instant responsiveness and service. For GameStop, it means the ability to react and seize opportunity in milli-seconds.

Marketing could watch real-time impacts unfold and react.
Well-timed offers made sales seem more like service.

Multi-touch digital service.

The system empowered GameStop to delight customers with instore recognition and right-time, right-offer messages that whilst, of course they were selling, seemed to the customer like service.

Well-timed offers made sales seem more like service.